About the Nichigetsukai

Matsudaira Crest



Purpose

The Nichigetsukai was founded on October 7th, 2002 in the state of California, to act primarily as an administrative branch and financial supplement to the efforts of our Gendai Budo dojo (not-for-profit) and Koryu Bujutsu dojo (non-profit) in Los Angeles. The purpose of founding this organization was to separate business and commerce from the day to day dojo affairs. Since a traditional dojo is not best served by becoming involved with commerce and business, the Nichigetsukai manages and coordinates the administrative efforts of these dojo, offering financial support as needed.

Structure

Because of the nature of the organization, it is not necessary (at this time) to formalize a rijikai or other such officer administrative structure. For the time being, there is simply a Director of General Affairs (Nathan Scott), consultants, and advisors, who are involved on an as-needed basis - along with our modest membership base.

Meaning

Nichigetsukai (), also pronounced Nichigachikai, translates literally as the "sun and moon organization". This name was selected for a number of reasons, one of which was to keep in following with the dojo nomenclature already established with the Tsuki Kage dojo, which means "moon shadow". The moon above must cast down its light in order to create a shadow. The moon is in turn illuminated by the sun, and as such, the moon is reliant on the sun for its own illumination. It is this interaction and continuous cycle (harmony) of the sun and moon that creates Tsuki Kage. As such, this basic concept was deemed appropriate for our supervisory/overseeing organization.

Mon

The mon (crest) used by the Nichigetsukai is the Matsudaira clan crest (see the image at the top of this page). The Hoshina (later called "Matsudaira") family were a close branch of the Tokugawa Shogunate family, and as such, the Hoshina main branch was allowed to use the Matsudaira name and a crest that was only slightly modified from the Tokugawa Aoi crest. This crest was selected because the Matsudaira family (fuedal lords of the Aizu Clan) represented a common link historically between two of the main arts studied by our membership.

Wago no Kami

In the Shinto belief, there is a legend of Izanami-no-Mikoto and Izanagi-no-Mikoto, a female and male set of deities respectively that were believed to be responsible for the creation of the Japanese islands. Izanami is a female deity (In/Yin), typically shown holding a crescent moon spear ("gekken") and sometimes shown with the moon above her. Izanagi is a male deity (Yo/Yang), typically shown with a sun spear ("hiboko"), and is sometimes shown with the sun above him. Nichigetsu symbolically carries with it the principle of in/yo (yin and yang). The sun and moon represent light and darkness (night and day, positive and negative), which was a core part of the early Japanese Shinto belief system as well as Confucianism and other Eastern philosophies. The manipulation and harmonization of In/Yo is also an important principle and tactic in Japanese martial arts, such as in the principle of "aiki" (harmonized energy). The sun and moon illustrate this symbolic relationship.

Research into documenting early references to the principle/concept of "aiki" has led to the possibility of a relationship between this principle and the Izanami and Izanagi mythical tradition (and others), which were originally recorded in documents such as the Kojiki and Nihon Shoki (two of Japans oldest known writings). These two deities are sometimes referred to collectively as "Wago no Kami", or, the "deities of harmony". Ueshiba Morihei Sensei, Founder of Aikido, was fond of the Wago no Kami as one of his symbols of harmony, and referred to it from time to time in his writings and various doka (songs of the way).

The image of the Wago no Kami shown at the bottom of this page is adapted from a reproduction from an old densho (transmission document) of the Shinkage ryu, one of the founding classical martial traditions of Japan.



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Wago no Kami

2003, Nichigetsukai